Medics and IT specialists combine for unique training App

16/04/2014

Medical consultants in Belfast have teamed up with IT specialists to develop a mobile training app that helps medics develop their skills where required, leading to more accurate diagnosis and better patient care.

The app provides immediate feedback to the user, and the more it is used by a doctor the more targeted and personalised the feedback becomes.

The Team behind Experior

The driving force behind the new device is Dr Tom Lynch, head of nuclear medicine at the Northern Ireland Cancer Centre in Belfast and Kevin Donaghy of Belfast based IT firm Experior Medical.

Dr Lynch says, "This is the medical and IT worlds coming together in Northern Ireland and producing something which is really unique.

The App contains thousands of typical x-ray images. While some are obvious, some aren't, but they are typical X-rays that doctors would see in an emergency department. This is a state-of-the-art testing and training tool - it will be used to improve the decisions made by junior doctors, and will let them know where they have gone wrong immediately and over the longer term. Because it is a mobile application, remotely monitored, medic’s right across the globe can use it.”

Remotely Monitors

Dr Lynch also said: "We already have doctors as far away as Australia and New Zealand using our app, wherever a doctor is in the world, X-rays are the same. Thousands of doctors are already using Experior Medical.”

Dr Kevin Donaghy provides the IT expertise he said: "When Tom first approached me with the idea of improving the skills of doctors with X-rays, I thought 'how do we build a solution that can be utilised by doctors and training organisations around the globe? How can we harness the best medical brains in the world to the benefit of all doctors and ultimately, all of their patients?"

"That's the bottom line - we wanted to develop a solution that improves diagnosis and health care for everyone.”

Primarily the application, known as Experior Medical, will be used in accident and emergency and cancer departments, but could eventually be rolled out across all health specialities and even into education, industry and financial services. It is expected that trials will start in Northern Ireland A&E units later this year.